comicsalliance:

Fox Affiliate Demonizes DC Comics Relaunch for Sex, Violence, Whatever [Video]

By Caleb Goellner

Did you know DC Comics relaunched its entire line of superhero comics in August? If not, a Washington, D.C. Fox network affiliate has the scoop for you! Don’t get too excited, though, because BAM! POW! These comics don’t seem to be for kids anymore! In a news report titled “Relaunched Comics Using Sex and Violence To Sell,” Sherri Ly points out, “Graphic violence and sex, that’s what you’ll find in the pages of DC Comics these days.” C-Could the innocent be getting s-seduced?!

It’s a pretty fascinating local news piece — not because it’s timely or totally accurate — but because it gives sequential art fans yet another look into the vague perceptions of the completely unengaged. In other words, this report is a hilarious example of how people who ordinarily can’t be bothered to remember comics exist generalize the medium when it suits their needs.

To be fair, the report does its best to suggest its own irrelevance from the start by showing a fan-created cover of Superman #1 and a pre-reboot cover of Wonder Woman to help audiences visualize the New 52 rather than, say, the actual New 52 art. But whatever, comics are a genre and not a medium, right? What difference does it make?

Next, Ly talks to a longtime comic fan and a comic shop owner who kind of acknowledge that, yes, these DC comics aren’t the same thing as Archie comics. The story demonstrates this by pointing out that the new DC books feature Batman and Catwoman having sex on a rooftop (True!), that Bruce Wayne has gotten drunk (Untrue — dude is faking it as usual), and that there’s decapitations (True!). Wow, things sure have changed since Batman had a TV show in the ’60s!

Ly also consults the wisdom of Neil Bernstein, Ph.D., a child psychologist and author of How to Keep Your Teenager Out of Trouble, who likens the comics to a “fictionalized Playboy,” because Playboy is a magazine noted for its realism.

The disparity between Starfire’s Teen Titans animated series persona and her knew characterization in Red Hood and the Outlaws is also pointed out (using what is plainly a fan-captioned clip from YouTube). Regular ComicsAlliance readers will remember that we’ve had plenty to say about Starfire and other characters who are worse off in the New 52, and the negative impact this characterization and other storytelling shifts has had and could continue to have on the superhero genre. While our critiques were specific and related to the way the presentation of certain material alienates readers, the Fox report demonizes clearly labeled mature material simply for being such. To reiterate: BAM! POW! Comics have never been just for kids, but there’s smarter ways of popping sex and violence into superhero stories in DC titles.

Perhaps the best part of the report is when Ly stands in front of a camera and essentially admits that the news piece is inherently ridiculous by stating, “The comic books are rated ‘T’ or ‘Teen Plus,’ meaning they’re not meant for younger children” before taking the comics to a middle school attended by children ages 11-14 at the oldest, to get their opinion on DC’s new books.

Read More.

comicsalliance:

 
Newspaper Cartoonists Observe 9/11 Anniversary

The writers and artists of America’s newspaper “funnies” accepted the seemingly daunting challenge of observing this past Sunday the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. King Features Syndicate, Creators Syndicate, Tribune Media Services, Universal Press Syndicate and Washington Post Writers Group organized the effort, which includes nearly 100 strips whose aim was to offer “solidarity, solace and sympathy,” according to King Features’ Brendan Burford, who spoke to The Los Angeles Times.Thanks to the prodigious list-making of The Comics Reporter, we’ve been able to read the majority of the 9/11 remembrance strips, all of which express the central themes of the endeavor with the level of sincerity the occasion demands. Those who managed to do so while maintaining their strips’ or characters’ traditional idioms impressed us the most.
See some of our favorites at ComicsAlliance.

comicsalliance:

Newspaper Cartoonists Observe 9/11 Anniversary

The writers and artists of America’s newspaper “funnies” accepted the seemingly daunting challenge of observing this past Sunday the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. King Features Syndicate, Creators Syndicate, Tribune Media Services, Universal Press Syndicate and Washington Post Writers Group organized the effort, which includes nearly 100 strips whose aim was to offer “solidarity, solace and sympathy,” according to King Features’ Brendan Burford, who spoke to The Los Angeles Times.

Thanks to the prodigious list-making of The Comics Reporter, we’ve been able to read the majority of the 9/11 remembrance strips, all of which express the central themes of the endeavor with the level of sincerity the occasion demands. Those who managed to do so while maintaining their strips’ or characters’ traditional idioms impressed us the most.

See some of our favorites at ComicsAlliance.

Amazon.com said on Thursday that the company now sells more eBooks than books printed on paper.

"Customers are now choosing Kindle books more often than print books," said Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s founder and chief executive, in a statement. “We had high hopes that this would happen eventually, but we never imagined it would happen this quickly — we’ve been selling print books for 15 years and Kindle books for less than four years.”

Since April 1, for every 100 print books sold on Amazon, 105 Kindle eBooks have been sold, as noted by Times reporter Carolyn Kellogg on our sister blog Jacket Copy.

thedailywhat:

Movie Trailer of the Day: First official trailer for Andrew Rossi’s Sundance-screened journalism sausage doc Page One: Inside The New York Times.

The film, which offers an in-depth look at “the transformation of a media landscape fraught with both peril and opportunity” through “unprecedented access to the New York Times newsroom,” will open in select theaters June 24.

[collider.]

carlovely:

kipp rusty walker, a very troubled 19 year old, stabbed himself to death with a six inch blade, on stage, at an open mic after playing a song called sorry for all the mess.
the audience tragically was under the impression that it was a performance piece, and clapped and cheered as the young musician ended his life right there in front of everyone.
yikes. read the whole story here.

I think creative types need more community and support, because god knows at one point this could have been me. I personally am here to support, help, and listen to anyone who may be going through hard times. I’ve been through a lot and I did it mostly alone, but you don’t need to. We all don’t need to.

carlovely:

kipp rusty walker, a very troubled 19 year old, stabbed himself to death with a six inch blade, on stage, at an open mic after playing a song called sorry for all the mess.

the audience tragically was under the impression that it was a performance piece, and clapped and cheered as the young musician ended his life right there in front of everyone.

yikes. read the whole story here.

I think creative types need more community and support, because god knows at one point this could have been me. I personally am here to support, help, and listen to anyone who may be going through hard times. I’ve been through a lot and I did it mostly alone, but you don’t need to. We all don’t need to.

nycthe:

[UPDATED BELOW] From The New York Times help section on Digital Subscriptions:

Can I still access NYTimes.com articles through Facebook, Twitter, Google or my blog?

Yes. We encourage links from Facebook, Twitter, search engines, blogs and social media. When you visit NYTimes.com through a…

totalfilm:

You might have a penchant for obscure Giallo, a hankering for low-budget horror… Or maybe you’re the all-knowing guru of ’80s movies…

Maybe you’ve made an independent film and want to tell the world about it… Or perhaps there’s an upcoming movie you have the inside track on.

If any of these…

Michel Gondry Adapting Philip K. Dick Novel ‘Ubik’

ballsmoke:

Video tour of News Corp.’s new The Daily iPad app. Nothing groundbreaking, but better than most such efforts to date. The “carousel” feature — more or less Cover Flow view for pages in the current issue — is incredibly laggy. I can’t believe they shipped it like this.

It definitely wasn’t a good sign when the install froze at about 99% on my iPad and required a reboot.

I’m beginning to think that Steve Jobs is glad he wasn’t able to appear at this event. The app reminds me of the old Encarta CD-ROM presentations. For the people that still think the future is in magazines and newspapers, this is surely a step in the right direction. But I never really read newspapers and I don’t intend on reading The Daily.

2000adonline:

Everything Comes Back to 2000 AD give a summary of the answers John Wagner gave after his visit to the Dredd film set:

So Mr John Wagner, the guy who actually created Dredd (but you all knew that), has been over visiting the set of the new Dredd movie. He’s now come back and taken some…

Vivian Maier, one of the greatest street photographers the world never knew

thedailywhat:

Amazing Discovery of the Day: Vivian Maier was an unassuming French-born amateur photographer who worked as a nanny in Chicago during the 50s and 60s. Two years prior to her death in 2009, a young real-estate agent stumbled upon thousands of her negatives at an estate sale, and purchased them for $400. 26-year-old John Maloof soon realized what he had actually paid for: The life’s work of one of the greatest street photographers the world never knew.

[petapixel.] 

agentmlovestacos:

Episode 0 of the new Marvel.com show I’ve been developing with host Grace Randolph and the Marvel.com video crew—The Watcher—is a special introductory/Thanksgiving edition! Gobble gobble!

Whoa. This is kind of surreal. It’s like a stepping stone into the future of Marvel via Disney. Can a channel be far behind? Marvel’s built up enough animation to fuel a station ala Cartoon Network’s Boomerang.

I think it’s a great idea. I kind of hate the host. But it’s so necessary to have something like this to focus the audience to the core Marvel books of note that should be marketed beyond the steady direct market and be consistent in book store sales, all while shilling out the digital copies to iPad readers.

To anyone who’s been reading comics since at least 1990, does this seem as surreal to you as it does to me?